2021-2022 Master of Social Work Student Handbook

Welcome and Introduction

Welcome to the Master of Social Work (MSW) Program at SUNY Brockport. We are excited that you have selected our Program to obtain your MSW degree and look forward to working in partnership with you during your course of study.

This Handbook is designed to familiarize you with important program policies, procedures, resources, and general information. We hope you will refer to this handbook for information about the MSW Program not only during the orientation period, but also throughout your course of study. Please refer to the MSW Field Education Manual for detailed information about field education.
It is our hope that your study with us will be stimulating, exciting, challenging, and filled with both personal and professional growth. The faculty and staff of the program stand ready to assist you as needed. We look forward to sharing this wonderful journey of graduate social work education with you!

The MSW Faculty and Staff

MSW Office Information

Brockport Downtown Office Hours (Subject to Change)

Day of the Week Office Hours
Monday 9 am – 6 pm
Tuesday 9 am – 6 pm
Wednesday 9 am – 6 pm
Thursday 9 am – 6 pm
Friday 10 am – 2 pm (closed during Summer Session)

Program Email: msw@brockport.edu
Phone: (585) 395-8450
Fax: (585) 395-8603

Accreditation & NYSED Registration

The MSW Program is registered by the NYS Education Department and the curriculum is approved as meeting the clinical credit hour requirements for the LCSW license.

The SUNY Brockport MSW Program is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

MSW Student Handbook Acknowledgment and Agreement Form

Upon their entrance to the program, students sign an acknowledgment, Student Handbook Agreement that they have received, will read, and will adhere to the policies and procedures set forth in the MSW Student Handbook. Students will receive an electronic copy for their records as well have access to a copy archived on Blackboard at, My Organizations, MSW Orientation & Information, Student Handbook.

All incoming students must review and sign.
Student Handbook Acknowledgment and Agreement

Office of Equity, Diversity, & Inclusion

We guide efforts to communicate to the College and outside community Brockport’s commitment to diversity and equity. We develop and monitor the College’s EDI Plan; prepare and analyze reports to monitor our success; and conceptualize and cultivate diversity as an institutional and educational priority.

College Statement of Nondiscrimination

SUNY Brockport is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. The college is committed to fostering a diverse community of outstanding faculty, staff, and students, as well as ensuring equal educational opportunity, employment, and access to services, programs, and activities, without regard to an individual’s race, color, national origin, religion, creed, age, disability, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, familial status, pregnancy, predisposing genetic characteristics, military status, domestic violence victim status, or criminal conviction. Employees, students, applicants or other members of the college community (including but not limited to vendors, visitors, and guests) may not be subjected to harassment that is prohibited by law or treated adversely or retaliated against based upon a protected characteristic.
The College’s policy is in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination and harassment. These laws include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as Amended by the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972, and the New York State Human Rights Law. These laws prohibit discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment and sexual violence. College affirmative action policies are available here.

Title IX Policy

Gender discrimination and sexual harassment are prohibited in class. Title IX legislation requires the College to provide gender equity in all areas of campus life. If you or someone you know has experienced gender discrimination, sexual harassment, or sexual assault, we encourage you to seek assistance and to report the incident through resources available here. www.brockport.edu/titleix/index.html. Confidential assistance is available at Hazen Center for Integrated Care. For these and other regulations governing campus life, please see all of our Student Polices.
You may make an anonymous gender-based and /or sexual misconduct report here.

Program Mission and Goals

Mission

The masters of social work program at SUNY Brockport, State University of New York, is committed to the promotion of human rights, social, economic, and environmental justice, and the elimination of poverty and oppression.
Through teaching, service, and scholarship, we strive to prepare competent, self- aware, ethical, and culturally humble integrated practice social workers, with diverse populations, advocating for the well-being of all people in our shared global community.

Goals

As a reflection of its mission, the overall goals of the Master of Social Work Program are to:

  1. Provide advanced social work education incorporating theoretical knowledge and critical thinking within an advanced integrated practice framework; emphasizing an ecological strength-based community collaborative, empowerment model of practice to promote social, economic and environmental justice.
  2. Educate social work practitioners who are ethical, critical thinkers engaged in ongoing inquiry and life-long learning.
  3. Develop practitioners who provide autonomous social work practice and leadership in health, human service, and other community organizations, as well as in diverse communities to assist high need or at-risk populations.
  4. Infuse a critical understanding and practice of cultural humility in working with diverse groups, and to adapt social work knowledge and skills to meet the needs of disenfranchised and historically oppressed groups.
  5. Educate social work practitioners to use evidence and knowledge to improve the effectiveness of social work practice, policies, and programs.
  6. Promote the health and well-being of individuals, families, groups, and communities by advancing understanding of social determinants of health to ensure justice in a changing environment and in a global society.

MSW Curriculum

Overview – Generalist Year Curriculum

The Generalist year introduces the student to the generalist perspective. The faculty adopted the CSWE 2015 EPAS definition of generalist practice, which states:

“Generalist practice is grounded in the liberal arts and the person-in-environment framework. To promote human and social well-being, generalist practitioners use a range of prevention and intervention methods in their practice with diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities based on scientific inquiry and best practices. The generalist practitioner identifies with the social work profession and applies ethical principles and critical thinking in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Generalist practitioners engage diversity in their practice and advocate for human rights and social and economic justice. They recognize, support, and build on the strengths and resiliency of all human beings. They engage in research-informed practice and are proactive in responding to the impact of context on professional practice.”

The generalist MSW curriculum is organized as a coherent and interrelated entity, consisting of generalist social work courses and generalist field practicum experiences. It is designed to demonstrate the integration and application of the nine-generalist competencies to ensure our students are prepared as competent generalist level social workers before beginning advanced course work. In addition, courses are designed to provide outcome based educational activities, which allow students to demonstrate the integration and application of the nine interrelated competencies and component behaviors. This is done by sequencing classes, as we recognize that competence is developmental and dynamic, changing over time to facilitate continuous learning (CSWE, EPAS, 2015).

The MSW curriculum draws from the liberal arts base that students have taken in their undergraduate degrees. The first 30 credits of the traditional 60-credit MSW program is the generalist level.

Generalist Competencies:

“Each competency describes the knowledge, values, skills, and cognitive and affective processes that comprise the competency at the generalist level of practice followed by a set of behaviors that integrate these components. These behaviors represent observable components of the competencies, while the previous statements represent the underlying content and processes that inform the behaviors (CSWE EPAS 2015 p.7).”

The faculty adopted the nine social work competencies specified in the 2015 EPAS.

Competency 1 – Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice.

Social workers:

  • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context;
  • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations;
  • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication;
  • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes; and
  • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.
Competency 2 – Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.

Social workers:

  • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels;
  • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences; and
  • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.
Competency 3 – Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive structural barriers to ensure that social goods, rights, and responsibilities are distributed equitably, and that civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights are protected.

Social workers:

  • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels; and
  • Engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.
Competency 4 – Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi-disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

Social workers:

  • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research;
  • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative research methods and research findings; and
  • Use and translate research evidence to inform and improve practice, policy, and service delivery.
Competency 5 – Engage in Policy Practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation.

Social workers:

  • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services;
  • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services;
  • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.
Competency 6 – Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may impact their ability to effectively engage with diverse clients and constituencies. Social workers value principles of relationship-building and inter-professional collaboration to facilitate engagement with clients, constituencies, and other professionals as appropriate.

Social workers:

  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies; and
  • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.
Competency 7 – Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision-making.

Social workers:

  • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies;
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies;
  • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies; and
  • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.
Competency 8 –Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence- informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of inter-professional teamwork and communication in interventions, recognizing that beneficial outcomes may require interdisciplinary, inter-professional, and inter-organizational collaboration.

Social workers:

  • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies;
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies;
  • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes;
  • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of diverse clients and constituencies; and
  • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.
Competency 9 – Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness.

Social workers:

  • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes;
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes;
  • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes; and
  • Apply evaluation findings to improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Advanced Standing Bridge Courses

Students that have earned a baccalaureate degree in social work from a CSWE accredited program within 8 years from time of admission to the MSW Program, are eligible to be considered for admission to the program as a 36-credit advanced standing student.

Advanced Standing MSW students are required to take two 3-credit bridge courses in before taking the 600 level advanced practice courses. *A grade of B- or better is required for SWK 508.

  • SWK 508: Diagnostic Process, Social Work Perspective – Prepares students with content on using the DSM-5 and strengths-based understanding of mental health challenges to prepare students with knowledge they will need for many advanced level field settings. (3 credits)
  • SWK 533: Critical Thinking and Social Work Research – Prepares students with the critical thinking skills required for empirical assessment of research findings to practice. (3 credits)

Overview – Advanced Integrated Practice

The MSW program’s area of specialty is Integrated Practice. Integrated Practice incorporates themes of social justice, ethics and values, with emphasis on intersectionality of power, privilege, oppression, discrimination, marginalization, disparities and their impact on human experience. Advanced MSW students are prepared to work with diverse client systems and incorporate collaborative community-based approaches in applying a range of micro to macro skills. The Integrated Practice area of specialty reflects the program’s commitment to prepare MSW graduates that are culturally humble, and able to assess social determinants of health and wellness. The Integrated practice competencies and observable bulleted behaviors reflect dimensions of knowledge, values, skills and cognitive & affective processes that extends and enhances the generalist competencies.
The MSW program’s area of specialty is Integrated Practice. Integrated Practice incorporates themes of social justice, ethics and values, with emphasis on intersectionality of power, privilege, oppression, discrimination, marginalization, disparities and their impact on human experience. Advanced MSW students are prepared to work with diverse client systems and incorporate collaborative community-based approaches in applying a range of micro to macro skills. The Integrated Practice area of specialty reflects the program’s commitment to prepare MSW graduates that are culturally humble, and able to assess social determinants of health and wellness. The Integrated practice competencies and observable bulleted behaviors reflect dimensions of knowledge, values, skills and cognitive & affective processes that extends and enhances the generalist competencies.
The MSW program’s formal curriculum for the Integrated Practice area of specialty is designed in a coherent and integrated manner for both classroom and field. The MSW curriculum committee ensures that course objectives, and assignments as well as course sequencing is designed to build on the depth of knowledge, values and skills from one course to the next.

Additionally, core concepts of cultural humility, ethics, and intersectionality of issues related to power and privilege are integrated along with critical thinking about social determinants of health. Plans of study guide when students take courses. Two plans of study are available for 60 credit students (a full-time two-year option and a 3 year/6-semester option). Additionally, the plans of study are designed to ensure that whether a student is full-time or part-time, students are taking specific practice courses concurrently with field placement to facilitate the transfer of practice knowledge and provide students with opportunities to apply practice skills learned in classes to their field placements concurrently.

Advanced Integrated Practice Curriculum

The advanced curriculum is 30 credits. Courses are sequenced to provide build on competency development. Full-time 60 credit students begin advanced course work in their second year, and part-time 60 credit students begin advanced coursework in their third year. Students accepted as 36 credit advanced stranding program, begin the integrated practice advanced curriculum concurrent with or after of completing SWK 508 and SWK 533.
Plans of study for full-time and part-time integrated practice advanced students have been carefully designed to ensure advanced competency development as well as integration of course work to field in a coherent and integrated manner. The Integrated Practice curriculum is designed to ensure all students have two advanced practice courses while also providing students some choice of practice course options. These practice course options are reflected in the plans of study. Students have two electives in their plans of study and an additional selection of an advanced practice course can be taken for elective credit. This is detailed in the plans of study. Students also take an advanced policy course, cultural humility practice course, advanced field courses and a culminating Master’s Project Thesis course during their advanced year plan of study.

Advanced Integrated Practice Competencies

Competency 1 – Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Integrated practice social workers differentially use theories, evidence-based practice knowledge social work skills and use an ethical reasoning framework to inform decisions related to ethical tensions and challenges. They apply the values base of the profession, its ethical standards as well are relevant laws, and regulations to their practice while using a self-reflective stance and initiating use of consultation and supervision. The advanced integrated practice social worker uses practice interventions to enhance the well-being of individuals, families, groups and communities in an ethical manner and recognize the importance of the therapeutic and collaborative relationship, the person-in-environment and strengths perspectives.

Social workers:

  • Initiate and effectively use supervision and consultation while maintaining a self- reflective stance;
  • Manage personal values and maintain therapeutic and collaborative relationships with client systems, supervisors, peers and inter-professional teams;
  • Effectively and ethically, integrate and communicate professional judgments to other social workers and to professionals from other disciplines in oral, written and electronic formats and
  • Demonstrate professionalism in behavior, appearance, communications, punctuality, time management and attendance.
Competency 2 – Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

Integrated practice social workers apply knowledge of diversity and difference in understanding the intersectionality’s of power, privilege, oppression, discrimination, marginalization, disparities and their impact on human experiences. Social workers practice using a cultural humility framework, incorporating self-reflection and discovery to build positive relationships while also challenging power imbalances. Social workers engage in multidimensional understanding in policy, practice to promote institutional accountability. Social workers recognize that no single solution may work equally well for all clients and therefore seek and integrate many facets of difference in planning interventions. Social workers know about the ways in which various dimensions of diversity impact social determinants of health and wellness, help-seeking behaviors and healing practices.

Social workers:

  • Understand the cultural humility framework and its impact on social work practice;
  • Recognize one’s own experience with power and privilege;
  • Demonstrate cultural humility and
  • Assess for relevant social determinants of health and well-being.
Competency 3 – Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Integrated practice social workers advocate for inclusion of clients and collaborating with partners to plan and develop programs, policies and laws related to serving clients and their families. To effect advocacy and needed change, social workers communicate effectively with partners. Advanced integrated practice social workers understand the discrimination and marginalization associated with disorders, diagnoses, and help-seeking behaviors across diverse populations.

Social workers:

  • Identify and use knowledge of relationship dynamics including power differentials to advocate at multiple levels for social, economic, employment, health, education, housing and human rights;
  • Understand the potentially challenging effects of economic, social, environmental and cultural factors in the lives of clients and client systems and
  • Engage in practices to positively impact social determinants of health and promote well- being.
Competency 4 – Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice

Integrated practice social workers consult the empirical and evidence-based forms of evidence to inform their understanding and guide practice decisions. Integrated practice social workers use critical thinking to examine the applicability of the research and evidence to diverse populations and obtain feedback from client systems using a cultural humility framework. In considering interventions, the social worker can select, implement, and evaluate appropriate assessment, intervention, and evaluation tools for use with various target populations and use research findings to improve practice, policy and social service delivery.

Social workers:

  • Identify, analyze and synthesis evidence to inform social work practice;
  • Demonstrate how evidence informs understanding of the multi-dimensions of integrated practice and the social determinants of health;
  • Demonstrate the knowledge of program evaluation in achieving intended outcomes and
  • Use research including evidence-based practice to evaluate and enhance the effectiveness of social work practice.
Competency 5 – Engage in Policy Practice

Integrated practice social workers analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance social well-being, and are knowledgeable and use advocacy methods to contribute to policies in promoting human rights and social justice. Integrated practice social workers collaborate and partner with client systems of all sizes to promote effective policy action.

Social workers:

  • Identify the connection of policy on client systems and practice;
  • Understand the role social determinates of health play in policy;
  • Assess what changes are needed in policy;
  • Formulate an action plan and
  • Advocate to influence policies that improve the lives of clients.
Competency 6 – Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Integrated practice social workers engage client systems and constituencies by understanding and applying a range of appropriate theories. To foster this engagement, social workers recognize the dynamic, interactive and reciprocal process of engagement with diverse populations. Integrated practice social workers apply principles of relationship building and collaboration to facilitate engagement. Integrated social workers consider the contexts of those experiences using a cultural humility perspective. Integrated practice social workers also recognize how their own life trajectory influences their engagement with diverse client systems and are self-reflective about their own reactions.

Social workers:

  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other theoretical frameworks to Engage with clients and constituencies;
  • use empathy, reflection, interpersonal skills and cultural humility to engage diverse clients and constituencies;
  • Manage the dynamics and contextual factors that both strengthen and potentially threaten the relationship
  • Develop rapport that encourages client(s) to be equal participants in the working relationship.
Competency 7 –Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Integrated practice social workers have the knowledge and skills to conduct comprehensive bio- psycho-social-spiritual assessments. Assessment includes an understanding of intersectionality issues as they impact the client experience. Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing process and includes input from clients and others. Social workers select appropriate methods for assessment based on client need and specific context. Social workers consider multiple sources of data and actively collaborate with others in the assessment process.

Social workers:

  • Conduct comprehensive assessments;
  • Collaborate with others to gather necessary information;
  • Include data and information from other relevant sources;
  • Ensure that the client is an active participant;
  • Continuously reassess based on client need and changing circumstances;
  • Develop mutually agreed upon goals and intervention strategies based on continuous assessment
  • Ensure that social work perspectives are present in inter-professional team meetings.
Competency 8 – Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Integrated practice social workers use empirical and theoretical knowledge to develop assessment-based interventions. In working with client systems, integrated practice social workers draw from multiple modalities and strategies and can match the intervention to the assessed need and client goal. Integrated practice social workers are skilled at choosing and implementing interventions to achieve client goals and enhance capacities of client systems. Social workers develop intervention plans in collaboration with client systems, inter-professional teams and partners using a strengths-based approach.

Social workers:

  • Apply critical thinking and understanding of theoretical frameworks in identifying interventions;
  • Using evidence, choose interventions that match the assessed need and client goal;
  • Develop appropriate intervention plans with measurable objectives and outcome;
  • Modify interventions as needed, based on evaluation findings
  • Effectively collaborate with others to achieve practice outcomes and
  • Mobilize resources and assets to enhance client system capacity.
Competency 9 –Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Integrated practice social workers apply skills to establish evidence-based evaluations founded on measurable goals, objectives and outcomes. Whether working collaboratively with or independently of other practitioners, social workers aim to ascertain the intended and unintended effects of interventions. Integrated practice social workers regularly evaluate the effectiveness of chosen interventions and modify them as needed. Integrated practice social workers communicate and disseminate evaluation results to intended audiences.

Social workers:

  • Regularly evaluate the effectiveness of chosen interventions;
  • Demonstrate the knowledge of practice evaluation in achieving intended outcomes and
  • Based upon the results of practice evaluation, adjust intervention plans on a continuing basis and appropriately disseminate findings.

Key Concepts*

In addition to the core content areas required by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) there are several key concepts that express themselves throughout the curriculum. These core concepts are:

  1. Community Collaboration
  2. Inter-professional / Interdisciplinary Teamwork
  3. Empowerment
  4. Strengths Perspective
  5. Evidence-Based Practice
  6. Social Determinants of Health
  7. Cultural Humility

Community Collaboration

For purposes of the MSW program, the term collaboration connotes a durable and pervasive relationship among individuals, groups, and organizations. We are committed to a definition that suggests that collaborations bring previously separated organizations into new structures with full commitment to a common mission. Such relationships require comprehensive planning and well-defined channels operating on many levels. Authority is determined by the collaborative structure. Resources are pooled or jointly secured, and the products are shared. Most significantly, the term collaboration includes a commitment to a definition of mutual relationships and goals and mutual authority and accountability for success (Mattessich & Monsey, 1992; Poulin, 2005). The MSW values community-based collaborations to solve complex community challenges. They draw upon building, using, and enhancing community resources that involve the actual client groups being targeted. Enhancing the capacity of local communities to serve as a major player in solving the social problems that face the community is a major goal of the program.

Empowerment

Within the context of the MSW program, empowerment is both an end-state and a process, which can be directed at multiple levels. The critical elements of empowerment are: an increased level of power within a system (self-efficacy, intra-system power), improves interaction at a given system level (group cohesion and interaction), increases ability to make demands between system levels (political awareness and action), and the ability to critically analyze the interaction between systems (critical thinking) aimed at increasing social justice within a democratic process (Itin, unpublished manuscript). Within the program, students are encouraged to view empowerment as requiring action on both the intra-systemic (e.g., within individuals, families, groups, organization or communities) and inter-systemic (e.g. between and among individuals, families and groups, agencies and organizations) levels. In this way, empowerment links to both the integrated practice perspective and the program’s focus on community-based collaboration. This view of empowerment supports practice across systems (e.g., case management, short-term interventions, psychotherapy, family therapy, community development, organizational change, research, policy development, and advocacy).

Strengths Perspective

The MSW program conceptualizes a strengths-based perspective as a collaborative effort between the service user and the social worker that avoids hierarchy with the intent to empower the client system (Ligon, 2002; Poulin, 2005). We are committed to the individual, family, group, organization or community acting on their own behalf. The role of the social worker is to facilitate the client’s utilization of his/her strengths while bridging this process to enable the client to mobilize his/her solutions.

Inter-professional and Interdisciplinary Teamwork

The MSW program conceptualizes inter-professional and interdisciplinary teamwork as processes that promotes partnership with service users through networking in multi-professional (e.g. psychologists, nurses, psychiatrists, doctors, case managements, occupational therapists) settings, whether in health or human services (Payne, 2000).
Inter-professional teams work collaboratively in assessment and intervention planning and value the knowledge of each team member. The coordination of services and responsibilities is essential on both inter-professional and interdisciplinary teams and, in this way, teamwork links to integrated practice, community-based collaboration and empowerment. Consumers are full and active members of the team. The approach aims to place the consumer as an equal partner with care providers. This definition of collaborative work means rethinking the role of “expert”. The expert becomes a team member contributing to systems problem-solving. The MSW program incorporates the client system as a team member who has equal power within the interdisciplinary team.

Evidence-Based Practice

The MSW faculty recognizes that preparing social work students as evidence-based practitioners involves teaching knowledge, values and skills necessary to facilitate the identification, critical appraisal application and evaluation of practice relevant evidence over the course of one’s professional careers (McMillion, & Pollo, 2003) informing practice with client systems of all sizes
(individual, family, group, organization and community).

MSW Program Definition

Evidence-based practice in social work is the conscientious, systematic, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions. The use of evidence- based social work means integrating individuals’ proficiency and judgment acquired through professional practice, expertise and professional standards of practice, the best available external evidence from systematic research, and the personal and cultural values and judgments of client systems (Cournoyer, 2004; Sackett, Roesenberg, Gary, Haynes & Richardson, 1996).

Levels of Evidence

The six categories represent varying levels of evidence for the use of a specific treatment procedure, or for a specific recommendation. This system was adopted from the Agency of Health Care Policy and Research classification of Level of Evidence (Foa, Keane & Friedman, 2000).

  • Randomized, controlled clinical trials
  • Well-designed clinical studies without randomization or placebo comparison
  • Service and naturalistic clinic studies combined with clinical observations, which are sufficiently compelling to warrant use of the treatment technique or follow the specific recommendation.
  • Long standing and wide-spread clinical practice that has not been subjected to empirical tests.
  • Long standing practice by circumscribed groups of clinicians that has not been subjected to empirical tests.
  • Recently developed treatment that has not been subjected to clinical or empirical tests.
  • Not applicable:

**Adapted from: Cournoyer, B.R. (2004). The evidence-based social work skills book. Allyn and Bacon, Boston MA.; Sackett, D.L., Roesenberg, W., Gary, J., Haynes, R.. & Richardson, W. (1996). Evidence based medicine: what it is and what it isn’t: It’s about integrating individual expertise and the best external evidence. BMJ, 312(7023:71-72; Howard, M. O., McMillion, C.J., & Pollo, D.E. (2003). Teaching evidence-based practice: Toward a new paradigm for social work education. Research on Social Work Practice, 13 (2)234-259. and Foa, B. E., Keane, T. M., & Friedman, M. J. (2000) Guidelines for Treatment of PTSD. Journal of Traumatic Stress, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2000.

Social Determinants of Health

Social determinants of health are defined by the World Health Organization (2008) as “the complex, integrated, and overlapping social structures and economic systems that are responsible for most health inequities. These social structures and economic systems include the social environment, physical environment, health services, and structural and societal factors. Social determinants of health are shaped by the distribution of money, power, and resources throughout local communities, nations, and the world.”

Cultural Humility

The MSW program infuses tenets of cultural humility throughout the curriculum beginning in the generalist year and continuing in the advanced year. Cultural Humility is a framework to effectively confront inequities in society related to social disparities in health based on various intersecting areas of diversity. There are three components to cultural humility: 1) lifelong learning and critical self-reflection; 2) recognizing and challenging power imbalances for respectful partnerships and 3) institutional accountability (Foronda, Baptiste, Reinholdt, Ousman, 2016; Hook, Davis, Owen, Worthington & Utsey, 2013; Tervaln & Murray- Garcia, 1998). Cultural Humility recognizes that knowledge of different cultures is insufficient and shifts the focus from the accumulation of knowledge to individual self-understanding. It also includes a personal/professional stance characterized by openness to learning and a lack of superiority (Hook, Davis, Owen, Worthington & Utsey, 2013).

SWK Course Descriptions

For a complete list of MSW course numbers, descriptions and credits, please visit the SUNY Brockport Course Catalog.

Practice and Field Practicum Course Restrictions Policy

All MSW Practice and Field Practicum courses are restricted to matriculated students pursuing the MSW degree. Consistent with CSWE accreditation standards, no exceptions are made to this policy.

Mandated Child Reporter Training: Identifying and Reporting Child Abuse and Maltreatment

Prior to graduation, MSW students are required, per NYS Education Department (NYSED), to participate in mandated reporter training for the identification and reporting of child abuse and maltreatment. The MSW Program is required to document that students have received this training. This training is scheduled as follows:

  • All students must complete the 2.5-hour online module through NYSED in SWK 533: Critical Thinking and SW Research as an assignment.
  • Students that have taken the certification within one calendar year are not eligible to complete the module, a copy of their prior completion must be provided.
  • Information on how to complete the Child Abuse and Neglect Mandated Reporter online training module are published in the SWK 533 Syllabi.
  • Students are required to print a certificate of completion once the module is completed and submit the certificate to their course instructor SWK 533.
  • The certificates of completion will be kept on file by the MSW program. Completion of this certificate will meet the requirement for the LMSW license.

MSW Plans of Study (POS)

The following are the Plans of Study for incoming students. It is the sole responsibility of each student to know, understand and complete the requirements for his/her degree program. Please consult with your advisor for any questions regarding your plan of study. Please see Appendix II.

Changing a Plan of Study

Students are expected to follow their designated plan of study. Current plans of study can be found at: https://www.brockport.edu/academics/social_work/graduate/student_resources.html

The program is aware that sometimes a student would like to change their plan of study or designated class time. To do this, students must do the following:

  1. Meet with their advisor to review their request. Students may be asked to provide a reason for the change. The advisor will approve the change.
  2. The student must contact the professor to ensure there is room available in the class and receive permission to add the class.
  3. Lastly, the student must receive permission from the program director to change their program of study.

While the program would like to be able to grant all changes, often this is not possible. Due to the strict schedule of when classes are offered, enrollment considerations, among other factors, not all requests can be granted. Please make sure to communicate a needed change as early as possible and be aware the request may or may not be able to be granted.

Graduate Certificate in Gerontological Social Work

MSW students can earn a 15-credit graduate certificate in Gerontological social work. The corner stone of this certificate is an advanced level field placement in a Gerontological social work setting (See course catalog for SWK 612 and SWK 613). In addition, students take six credits of electives from the list of approved courses below.

The Graduate Certificate in Gerontological Social Work is value added to the MSW degree and can be completed within the existing 36 credit and 60 credit plans of study through the selection of approved electives and advanced field placement. Please contact Professor Debra Fromm Faria dffaria@brockport.edu to discuss the certificate program. For more information including course requirements, please visit Gerontological Certificate program page.

Evidence Based Practice (EBP) in Mental Health Traineeship

Students will learn to deliver advanced therapeutic practices that have proven effective through clinical research working with clients with serious mental illness, using recovery-oriented evidence-based practices. Successful completion of following in their advanced practice curriculum:

  1. EBP Field Placement – NYS Office of Mental Health (NYS OMH) approved site
  2. Colloquia (faculty mentorship)
  3. SWK 654: EBP in Mental Health course

Field Education

The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) has determined field education is the signature pedagogy for social work education.

Signature Pedagogy

Signature Pedagogy represents the central form of instruction and learning in which a profession socializes its students to perform the role of practitioner. Professionals have pedagogical norms with which they connect and integrate theory and practice. In social work, the signature pedagogy is field education. The intent of field education is to connect the theoretical and conceptual contribution of the classroom with the practical world of the practice setting. It is a basic precept of social work education that the two interrelated components of curriculum-classroom and field-are of equal importance within the curriculum, and each contributes to the development of the requisite competencies of professional practice. Field education is systematically designed, supervised, coordinated and evaluated based on the criteria by which students demonstrate the achievement of program competencies.

Purpose of Field Instruction

Field instruction provides the opportunity for students to integrate theory and knowledge into practice through skill development and skill refinement within the context of professional values and ethics. Curriculum content areas of Human Behavior and the Social Environment, Social Welfare Policy, Research, and Practice are combined with the student’s life experience to form the basis of professional practice. The agency site with experienced professional supervision serves as the training ground for student knowledge and skill development. Expectations are that the student develops practice competencies from a generalist perspective in the foundation year. In the advanced field practicum, it is expected that students will focus on their skill and knowledge enhancement. Students as advanced practitioners must demonstrate an ability to analyze, intervene, and evaluate in ways that are highly differentiated, discriminating, and self- critical. They must synthesize and apply a broad range of knowledge as well as practice with a high degree of autonomy and skill. Additionally, they must be able to refine and advance the quality of their practice as well as that of the larger social work profession.

Structure of Field Instruction

The field instruction component of the curriculum is designed with a two-semester generalist level concurrent field placement and two semester concurrent advanced level integrated practice field placement. The generalist and advanced field placement provide students with opportunities to integrate social work knowledge, values and skills in the application of professional practice at progressive levels. Advanced level field placements are in the students integrated practice field of practice.

Generalist Year

Field placement requires a minimum of 200 hours/semester for two semesters, for a total of 400 hours. For a 14-week semester, this averages 14.5 hours/week. Students are required to complete at least 12 hours/week and no more than 18 hours/week as their regular schedule.

Integrated Practice Advanced Placement

Students complete a minimum of 250 hours/semester for two semesters, for a total of 500 hours. For a 14-week semester, this averages 18 hours/week. Students with an approved extended semester are required to complete at least 16 hours per week.
Monitoring and integration of the experience for a student is facilitated through Field Practicum Seminar, SWK 504 & 505, Generalist Year, and SWK 610 & 611, Advanced Year for both fall and spring. Students must register for and continue with the same instructor and section of field and seminar for both semesters.

The total clock hours for the MSW Field Practicum for the 60-credit full and part-time options is 900 hours. Students in the 36-credit Advanced Standing Program complete the integrated practice advanced Field Practicum requirements of 500 clock hours. Please refer to the Field Education Manual for specific detailed information and educational policies.

Academic Advisement

Individual advisement of students is a major and vital component of the educational experience for graduate professional social work education. The purpose of advisement is to help students obtain the maximum benefit from the educational experience. A process of developmental advisement will be utilized to help students integrate the professional and personal self. The focus is on both on academic and professional advisement.

Faculty Advisor Assignments

All incoming students are assigned a full-time faculty member as their advisor for the duration of their program. Advisor assignments and contact information are made available in the student’s on-line acceptance packet and may also be found in their Web Banner account.

Accessing Faculty Advisor Information (Web Banner)

  1. Log in to Web Banner using your NetID and Password
  2. Click on the Student Services tab
  3. Click on Student Records
  4. Click on View Student Information to view information from the general student record including entry term, level, class, advisor, major and degree type.

Students may request a change in advisor, please see the process on, “Changing Advisors” below.

Right to Advisement

Students have the right to proper advisement. The MSW Program places high value on the advising process. Academic and professional advising assists in achieving awareness and understanding of each student’s abilities and needs. Joint effort by both students and faculty is required in sharing the responsibility of structuring and implementing an educational plan that meets students’ needs. Advisement is needed for the academic and professional development of students.
Students accepted into the MSW Program will be assigned to a full-time member of the MSW program faculty for ongoing academic and professional advisement. For continuity, students will ordinarily remain with the assigned faculty member through degree completion. Students meet with their advisor each semester for course selection/registration. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor whenever there are concerns regarding course performance.
Mutual respect should govern the interactions between advisors and students. Students and advisors have advising responsibilities to prepare for, actively participate in, and take appropriate action following advising sessions.

Student Responsibilities

  • To take advantage of advising services and associated resources.
  • To understanding the requirements of the degree program and to return various program forms by the deadlines.
  • To know the policies of the Graduate School that govern master’s-level graduate students.

Faculty Advisor Responsibilities

To assist the student with the transition into graduate study and support the student’s initial involvement in the educational experience.

  1. To discuss the rationale for degree requirements, institutional and/or departmental requirements, policies, and procedures.
  2. To assist in developing the student’s plan of study and provide guidance for revisions as needed.
  3. To analyze the student’s study skills, especially when difficulties with courses are indicated, and discuss course selections and other options available to the student.
  4. To discuss possibilities for institutional and departmental involvement.
  5. To review the student’s academic performance and provide consultation and guidance as needed.
  6. To provide consultation and referral as needed, regarding academic or personal issues that may arise related to the student’s participation in the Program.
  7. To provide guidance for the student’s professional development.
  8. To approve the student’s elective course selections.
  9. To provide guidance toward the successful completion of the MSW program.

Students will be required to meet a minimum of once per semester with their faculty advisor and are encouraged to meet more frequently as needed. All Brockport MSW faculty advisors will hold regular office hours for advisement. The following times are especially important:

  • During registration.
  • Before any drop/add changes.
  • Following any report of unsatisfactory academic performance.
  • Prior to withdrawal from the program.
  • When a student is experiencing personal, social adjustment, academic problems/challenges that are affecting performance in the program.
  • Record check for graduation.

During students’ initial conferences with their advisor, the Social Work Program’s curriculum is thoroughly reviewed. This curriculum outlines the course requirements for the student in sequential order and program requirements are discussed along with students’ educational and career goals. The advisor helps advisees relate past educational achievements to their present educational goals. Advisees are encouraged to become familiar with NASW Code of Ethics, professional Social Work Journals, organizations, and books in order to further assess and develop their social work education.
Academic advisement is typically scheduled for late October for spring registration and late March for summer/fall registration; please check the MSW academic calendar for specific dates. Check with your advisor for specific requirements for the MSW program and dates/times for advisement.

Please remember, however, that advisors are always available to answer questions and they provide both academic and professional advisement.

Changing Advisor

A student may request a change of MSW faculty advisor by contacting the desired MSW faculty advisor to obtain that faculty member’s agreement to serve as advisor and informing the original advisor of the change. Once these steps are completed, the student then submits a petition form to the MSW administrative office signed by the faculty confirming this change.

Student Advisement Goal Planning Guide

On occasion, a student may need to do some goal planning around a specific identified need with their advisor. These needs can include or addressing a performance question (e.g. behavior inconsistent with NASW Code of Ethics). This worksheet is designed to assist with the problem solving and may be found in Appendix II.

Review of Student Progress

Each semester and throughout the semester, students’ progress will be evaluated by the faculty who are providing instruction and by the academic advisors to ensure that students are meeting standards for continuation in the Program. Students are expected to maintain a 3.0 GPA during all semesters. Additionally, the Center for Graduate Studies also completes a grade audit each semester to ensure students remain in good standing and to notify a student of institutional policies if their overall semester grade drops below 3.0. In the MSW program, no grade below a C is considered passing.

Students who do not meet these academic standards will meet with their academic advisor. The advisor will also consult with the program director and Center for Graduate Studies to determine an appropriate plan of study (e.g. to determine if other College policies are also impacted) which may include remediation and/or specific strategies and if continued enrollment in the Program is warranted. Further information regarding academic standards may be found in the section on Program Policies.

Advanced Standing Students

Students in the 36-credit advanced standing program must obtain/maintain a 3.0 in the advanced standing bridge courses SWK 508 and SWK 533 to maintain advanced standing status.

Academic Standing/Probation

Matriculated graduate students who have completed at least nine graduate credits at Brockport and whose cumulative Brockport graduate GPA falls below 3.0 are placed on Academic Probation I. Students receive written notification of their probationary status from The Graduate School.

Academic Probation I

Students are allowed to take up to twelve graduate credits on Academic Probation I. Students on Academic Probation I will be eligible to register for classes once a “Return to Good Academic Standing Course Plan” is approved and signed by their graduate advisor or program director as well as by the Graduate Dean (or the Dean’s designee).
Students on Academic Probation I who achieve a minimum cumulative Brockport graduate GPA of 3.0 after completing any of the twelve credits will be returned to good academic standing. If a student does not achieve the minimum cumulative Brockport graduate GPA of 3.0 after completing the twelve credits, the respective department Graduate Committee will review the student’s academic file and either:

  • Academically dismiss the student from the program immediately; or
  • Place the student on Probation II status.

Academic Probation II

Students on Probation II receive written notification of their probationary status from The Graduate School. They can take up to six graduate credits on Academic Probation II.
Students on Academic Probation II will be eligible to register for classes once a “Return to Good Academic Standing Course Plan” is approved and signed by their graduate advisor or program director as well as by the Graduate Dean (or the Dean’s designee).
Students on Academic Probation II who achieve a minimum cumulative Brockport graduate GPA of 3.0 after completing any of the six credits will be returned to good academic standing. Students who do not achieve the minimum cumulative Brockport graduate GPA of 3.0 after completing the six credits will be academically dismissed.
Academic Conditions of Admission supersede Academic Standing/Academic Probation Policy.

Return to Good Academic Standing Plan Form

This plan is meant to help you achieve good academic standing (cumulative 3.0 GPA) at the College and complete your degree. For more details on academic probation and the financial aid implications of probation, please refer to the following links on graduate policies:

Academic Standing/Academic Probation

Federal Academic Standards for Graduate Financial Aid Recipients

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards to Retain Eligibility for Federal Title IV Financial AID – Graduate Level

Students are advised that continued eligibility for federal financial aid awards requires that students maintain compliance with Federal Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards. Federal Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards are reviewed at the end of each academic term. Students who fail to maintain pace, who fall below the required grade point average, or who meet or surpass the maximum time frame standard, or any combination of the standards, will be considered out of compliance and ineligible to receive Federal Title IV aid for future semesters, beginning immediately, until compliance has been regained. Notification of ineligibility following the term will be sent to students after the semester grades have been analyzed.

Academic Dismissal

Students may be academically dismissed from a graduate program for reasons:

  • Failure to meet the conditions of a Conditional Admission, following recommendation of the academic department.
  • Failure to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above (see academic probation policy).
  • Failure to meet individual program requirements. Such requirements may be in addition to and more restrictive than those delineated in the preceding two items.

Note: See Standards for Evaluating Academic Performance i , Policies and Procedures for Review of Academic Performance and Academic Grievances and Policies and Procedures for Review of Academic Performance and Academic Grievances located below for MSW program specific policies and procedures.
A student who has been academically dismissed from any graduate degree program at SUNY Brockport must wait at least six months before enrolling in any graduate course at the college. Students may explore options for appeal of an academic dismissal with the School Dean that is affiliated with their graduate program. These Institutional policies and procedures are available here.

MSW Standards for Evaluating Academic Performance ii , Policies and Procedures for Review of Academic Performance and Academic Grievances

Introduction

This document sets forth standards for evaluating academic performance, and policies and procedures for review of academic performance and academic grievances. These standards, policies and procedures apply to students enrolled in the MSW program. These standards are linked to students’ abilities to become effective social work professionals and are provided so that students and faculty can be clear about expectations and procedures to address academic performance concerns. The goal of these policies is to help students have a successful experience in the MSW program.
Faculty and field instructors who teach and supervise students, along with the MSW program director, will assess student academic performance and apply their professional judgment to determine if standards are being met during a student’s educational career. Professional judgment is the capacity to assess a situation by applying the values and knowledge of the social work profession, combined with a professional’s own experience and practice wisdom. It also represents the application of knowledge, values, and skills to making decisions in a helping process.
All social work students will be provided with and expected to read the Standards for Evaluating Academic Performance, Policies and Procedures and the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of
Ethics (1999) iii in the MSW Student Handbook. Students will be asked to sign an acknowledgment that they have read, are aware of the contents of, and will abide by, the documents. The signed form will be kept in the student’s active file. All relevant federal, state, and local laws, as well as the institutional policies of SUNY Brockport, are applicable to these standards.

Standards for Evaluating Academic Performance

The MSW program evaluates academic performance in four general areas:

  • Basic abilities to acquire professional skills;
  • Mental and emotional abilities;
  • Professional performance skills
  • Scholastic performance.
  • Both professional behavior and scholastic performance comprise academic standards.

These standards were adapted in part from policies developed by the University of Texas at Austin, School of Social Work.

  1. Basic Abilities Necessary to Acquire Professional Skill:
    1. Communication: Demonstrates sufficient written and oral skills to comprehend information and communicate ideas and feelings.
      1. Written: Writes clearly, uses correct grammar and spelling, and applies appropriate writing style, including American Psychological Association (APA) referencing, appropriate source citation, and documentation. Demonstrates enough skills in written English to understand content presented in the program and to complete adequately all written assignments, as specified by faculty.
      2. Oral: Communicates effectively and sensitively with other students, faculty, staff, clients, and professionals. Expresses ideas and feelings clearly and demonstrates a willingness and an ability to listen to others. Demonstrates enough skills in spoken English to understand content presented in the Program, to complete adequately all oral assignments (with or without accommodations), and to meet the objectives of field placement experiences, as specified by faculty.
    2. Interpersonal Skills: Demonstrates the interpersonal skills needed to relate effectively with other students, faculty, staff, clients, and professionals and to fulfill the ethical obligations of the profession. These include compassion, empathy, altruism, integrity, and demonstration of respect for and consideration of others. Takes appropriate responsibility for own actions and considers the impact of these actions on others.
    3. Cognitive Skills: Exhibits enough knowledge of social work and clarity of thinking to process information and apply it to appropriate situations in classroom and field. Demonstrates grounding in relevant social, behavioral and biological science, knowledge, and research— including knowledge and skills in relationship building, data gathering, assessment, intervention, and evaluation of practice. Exhibits ability to conceptualize and integrate knowledge and apply that knowledge to professional practice.
    4. Physical Skills: Exhibits enough motor and sensory abilities to attend and participate in class and practicum placement, with or without accommodations. (See section on Accommodations for Disabilities for clarification).
  2. Emotional and Mental Abilities necessary for performance in the program and professional practice:
    1. Stress Management: Demonstrates ability to deal with current life stressors through the use of appropriate coping mechanisms. Handles stress effectively by using appropriate self-care and developing supportive relationships with colleagues, peers, and others.
    2. Uses sound judgment: Seeks and effectively uses help for medical or emotional problems that interfere with scholastic and professional performance. Engages in counseling or seeks out support and help if personal problems, psychosocial distress, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties do any of the following:
      1. Compromise scholastic and other performance,
      2. Interfere with professional judgment and behavior, or
      3. Jeopardize the best interests of those with whom the social work student has a professional responsibility (as outlined in the current Code of Ethics by the National Association of Social Workers).
  3. Professional Performance Skills: Necessary for work with clients and professional practice:
    1. Professional Commitment: Exhibits a strong commitment to the goals of social work and to the ethical standards of the profession, as specified in the NASW Code of Ethics. Demonstrates commitment to the essential values of social work that includes the respect for the dignity and worth of every individual and his/her right to a just share of society’s resources (social justice).
    2. Professional Behavior: Exhibits behaviors that follow program policies, institutional policies, professional ethical standards, and societal laws, in classroom, field, and community including:
      1. Shows potential for responsible and accountable behavior by knowing and practicing within the scope of social work;
      2. Respects others, is punctual and dependable, prioritizes responsibilities, attends class regularly, observes deadlines, completes assignments on time, keeps appointments, and makes appropriate arrangements. Students should not have late assignments, request extended deadlines, or expect the opportunity to re-write assignments at the graduate level.
      3. Works effectively with others, regardless of level of authority;
      4. Advocates in an appropriate and responsible manner and uses proper channels for conflict resolution;
      5. Shows a willingness to receive and accept feedback and supervision in a positive manner, as well as use such feedback to enhance professional development.
      6. Appearance, dress, and general demeanor reflect a professional manner.
    3. Self –Awareness: Exhibits knowledge of how one’s values, attitudes, beliefs are demonstrated in the following ways:
      1. Incorporates professional knowledge, values and skills in professional decision-making;
      2. Recognizes that in a helping process, emotions and past experiences affect thinking, behavior and relationship;
      3. Accurately assesses one’s own strengths, limitations, and suitability for professional practice.
      4. Shows awareness of self and how one is perceived by others.
      5. Reflects on one’s own limitations as they relate to professional capacities.
      6. Is willing to examine and change behavior when it interferes in working with clients and other professionals.
    4. Ethical Obligations: Current behavior and classroom performance demonstrate adherence to the ethical expectations and obligations of professional practice, noted in the NASW Code of Ethics. Ethical behaviors include:
      1. Adherence to the NASW Code of Ethics;
      2. Systematic evaluation of clients and their situations in an unbiased, factual way; comprehension of another individual’s way of life and values.
      3. The use of empathic communication and support of the client as a basis for a productive professional relationship.
      4. Appreciation of the value of diversity and effective and nonjudgmental relation to and work with others who are different from oneself. Appropriate service to all persons in need of assistance, regardless of the person’s age, class, race, religious beliefs, gender, disability, sexual orientation, and/or value system. No imposition of personal, religious, sexual, and/or cultural values on clients.
      5. Demonstration of respect for the rights of others including the client’s rights to freedom, choice and self-determination.
      6. Maintenance of confidentiality as it relates to human service, classroom activities, and field placement.
      7. Demonstration of honesty and integrity by being truthful about background, experiences and qualifications; doing one’s own work; giving credit for the ideas of others; and providing proper citation of source materials.
      8. Demonstration of clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries; does not sexually harass others; make verbal or physical threats; become involved in sexual relationships with clients, supervisors, or faculty, abuse others in physical, emotional, verbal, or sexual ways; or participate in dual relationships where conflicts of interest may exist.
  4. Scholastic Performance:
    1. Students are considered to be in academic difficulty if their GPA falls below a 3.0. When this occurs, students are placed on academic probation and may take no more than six credits in a semester. Students have two semesters to achieve a 3.0.
      Students receiving an Unsatisfactory (U) grade for field or an F in any required social work course are considered also to be in academic difficulty. An automatic field review is called for students receiving an unsatisfactory grade in field and an academic review may be called for students doing poorly in or failing a required social work course. An overall GPA of 3.0 is required for graduation.

Policies and Procedures for Review of Academic Performance

Academic Reviews

An academic review is a formal review process. There are two types of Academic Reviews: General
Academic Review and Field Review. If the academic performance standard concerns relate to the field
practicum alone, the Field Review procedures will be followed. All other reviews will follow the General Academic Review policies and procedures.

Pre-General Academic Review

The MSW faculty responsibilities include monitoring students’ academic performance. In the course of carrying out this responsibility, faculty will discuss concerns regarding the student’s academic performance to assess if an academic performance concern is identified in a specific area and to identify patterns of concern being assessed. The standards for Academic Performance are utilized as the criteria to assess academic performance. If concerns are identified, several steps may be chosen to address the concern with the student. Pre-review activities are informal processes to discuss the identified concerns with the student and to develop an action plan to assist the student to address the concerns satisfactorily. The following are examples of pre-review activities:

  1. An individual meeting between the faculty member and student to discuss the academic performance concern.
  2. Informal group meeting with the student, student’s academic advisor and faculty identifying the academic concern.

There are extenuating situations in which the academic performance concerns assessed by faculty require immediate referral to the program director for an Academic Review. In these cases, the Academic Review Policies and Procedures will be followed without pre-review activities.

General Academic Review

The Review is convened by the MSW program director and will include the student, the student’s advisor and one or more MSW faculty having direct knowledge of the student’s academic performance. If either the MSW program director or faculty identifying the performance concern is also the student’s academic advisor, the student will be assigned another member of the faculty to serve as advisor during the review.

  1. The program director will serve as chair and the recorder for this review. The student, advisor, and MSW faculty may present information both verbally and in writing as part of the Review.
  2. The student can request the presence of a supportive MSW Community member at the review.
  3. The Review will usually result in immediate decisions. In the event of significant concerns or the need for additional information, the program director, academic advisor and participating faculty may elect to go into executive session.
  4. Written decisions must be made within ten business days of the Review and placed in the student’s permanent student record.
  5. Formal student notification of the review decisions must be made within ten business days of the Review and is sent by certified mail.
  6. Remedial actions to address the concerns may include the following:
    1. The student may be required to take specific actions to address academic concerns related to the four performance standards (basic abilities to acquire professional skills, mental and emotional abilities, professional performance skills, and scholastic performance). The remedial actions identified should specify implementation actions to be taken, demonstrated outcomes, and timeframe.
    2. The student may choose to take a leave of absence from the program and reapply at a later date. If this option is chosen it should include specific tasks that must be accomplished to be considered for return to the program.
    3. The student may choose to withdraw from the program.
    4. The student may be terminated from the program.

General Academic Review Appeal

A student who believes that the case has not been handled appropriately or resolved to her or his satisfaction may appeal in writing utilizing the appropriate procedures of the home institution of the student’s faculty advisor. These procedures are outlined in the Student Appeal and Grievance Procedures Regarding Contesting a Program Action.

Academic Field Review

Pre-Field Review Activities

The field practicum is an integral part of the student’s educational experience and preparation for professional practice. In the process of conducting student supervision, it is expected that the field instructor will provide ongoing feedback to the student on her/his progress toward meeting field objectives. In the event the student is not meeting field objectives, the field instructor, in consultation with the faculty liaison, should discern the source of the problem the student is experiencing. It should be determined if the problem is:

  • Environmental (e.g. agency and or field instructor related)
  • Situational (e.g. interpersonal, illness, family, or similar circumstances); or
  • Performance-related (e.g. illegal behavior, unethical behavior, lack of appropriate professional identification, inability to successfully complete assigned tasked, inability to develop appropriate social work skills, or inability to meet other field objectives).

It should be noted that some situations included under performance related are grounds for immediate dismissal from field. These can include but are not limited to: unethical or illegal behavior, negligence, actions that are considered unsafe by the agency, or MSW program, violations of institutional policies or procedures. In these cases, the Academic Field Review Policies and Procedures will be followed without pre-review activities. If the situation also involves other areas of the academic performance a full Academic Review will be held.
The field team of student, field instructor and faculty liaison should attempt to address the specific problem and work toward a solution. Also, each party should document the nature of the problem, the steps taken to address solutions, and the outcome of those attempts.
In the event of poor field performance, which will likely result in the student not meeting the criteria for a grade of “S” (Satisfactory) the following procedures should be used:

  • The field instructor should communicate regularly with the student about concerns regarding performance.
  • The field instructor and the student should document together or separately that they met and what steps have been taken to address the problem(s).
  • The field instructor will contact the faculty liaison and summarize the nature of the problem(s) and the steps taken to address them.
  • The faculty liaison will schedule a meeting with the student and field instructor and notify the Director of Field Education
  • In preparation of this meeting, the field instructor will provide a written statement summarizing the nature of the concerns or problems, and the steps taken to address them. The student, faculty liaison will receive copies.
  • The liaison will meet with the student and field instructor, summarize the discussion occurring during the meeting and provide copies of the written summary to the Director of Field Education and faculty advisor.
  • A Field Review must be conducted if the student receives a grade of Unsatisfactory “U.”

Field Review Procedures

The review must be scheduled within the first two (2) weeks of the spring semester for grades relating to fall term and within two (2) weeks of the end of the spring semester for grades related to spring term.

  • The review is convened by the director of field education and will include the student, the student’s advisor, the field instructor, field liaison and MSW Program Director. If either the Director of Field Education or the faculty liaison is also the student’s advisor, the student will be assigned another member of the faculty serve as advisor during the review.
  • The faculty liaison will summarize in writing the contacts and actions taken and will provide copies to all parties involved in the review.
  • The Director of Field Education will act as chair and recorder for this review. The student, advisor, liaison, field instructor may present information both verbally and in writing as part of the Review.
  • The student can request the presence of a supportive Community member at the review.
  • The Review will usually result in immediate decisions. In the event of significant concerns or the need for additional information, the Director of Field Education, faculty liaison, faculty advisor and Program Director may elect to go into executive session.
  • Written decisions must be made within ten business days of the Review and placed in the student’s permanent student record.
  • Formal student notification of decisions must be made within ten business days of the Review.
  • Remedial actions to address the concerns may include the following:
    • The student may be required to complete additional field hours.
    • A change of placement may be made.
    • The student may choose to take a temporary leave of absence from the program.
    • The student may choose to withdraw from the program and reapply at a later date.
      • If this option is chosen, it should include specific tasks that must be accomplished to be considered for return to the program.
    • The student may be recommended for termination from the program.

Appealing the Decision of an Academic or Field Review

A student who believes that the case has not been handled appropriately or resolved to her or his satisfaction may appeal in writing. These procedures are outlined below:

Student Appeal and Grievance Procedures

Students who have grievances regarding courses or program action should seek resolution within the program and department according to the following procedures:

  1. Student contacts and consults with the program director or academic advisor to seek clarification regarding program action within two weeks of being informed of the program action.
  2. If no satisfactory resolution is obtained regarding program action, the student appeals in writing to the department chair within 30 days of the decision notification of the program action. If the department chair was involved in decision affecting the student, the Associate Dean of the School of Education, Health and Human Services, will review the student appeal.
  3. The written appeal must include details of the student’s grievance and the reasons as to why she or he believes the matter requires additional consideration. Any relevant supporting documents should be attached to the appeal.
  4. The department chair may request any or all the following when considering the student’s appeal: additional data; consultation with the student, instructor, and/or faculty advisor; formal meeting(s) between all parties involved. Any formal meeting(s) will be held within two weeks of receipt of all written documents.
  5. Written notification of the department chair’s decision will be forwarded to all parties concerned within 15 business days of receipt of the student’s written appeal. A copy of the decision will be placed in the student’s academic advisement file for department record.
  6. If no satisfactory resolution is obtained, he/she may appeal in writing to SUNY Brockport’s Associate Dean, School of Education, Health and Human Services and provide supporting material.
  7. Written notification of the associate dean’s decision will be forwarded to all parties concerned within two weeks of receipt of the student’s written appeal. A copy of the decision will be placed in the student’s academic advisement file for department record.
  8. If no satisfactory resolution is obtained, he/she may appeal in writing to the vice-Provost at SUNY Brockport, SUNY.
  9. Grade appeals follow the College of Brockport’s Grade Appeal Policy and Procedures.

Grade Appeals

Students should address any question or disagreement about grades as quickly as possible with the course instructor and/or department chair. An attempt to resolve the issue informally with the instructor and or department chair is required in all cases. After carrying out the informal process, however, the student may wish to initiate a further appeal. Time limits for grade appeals: The student must file a written grade appeal with the department chairperson within thirty (30) calendar days from the date on which the registrar posts the grades for the semester in which the course was taken. During this 30-day period, the student must also engage in the informal attempt to resolve the disagreement.

Social Work Professional Conduct

Students in the MSW Program are expected to conduct themselves in a manner consistent with the NASW Code of Ethics, the values of the profession, and the Program. This includes, but is not limited to, respect for others, personal integrity, a commitment to human rights, social and economic justice and social change, an openness to growth and change, respect for the views of others, tolerance for difference, and respect for human diversity. Additionally, students are expected to adhere to all policies of SUNY Brockport regarding student conduct, published in the Graduate Catalog, Student Handbooks, and other published documents.

During the academic experience in the MSW Program, students are given guidelines and standards to assist their transition to a professional role. Professional Conduct is a significant part of the professional and academic standards in the social work degree program. Professional conduct involves the core performance behaviors of:

Professional conduct and accountability involve the following expectations integrating the core performance behaviors:

  • Task management
  • Self-awareness
  • Professional relationships with respect for diversity and appropriate boundaries (with peers and professors as well as clients and supervisors)
  • Clear, timely, and responsible communication
  • Ethical decision – Adherence to the NASW Code of Ethics
  • Use of proper channels for conflict resolution
  • Critical thinking
  1. Students are expected to attend every graduate class, come prepared to discuss the readings, share ideas, engage in active critical thinking and discussion, and respect diverse perspectives. Critical thinking and respect for diverse perspectives involve learning as much as possible about opposing viewpoints as well as one’s own viewpoint.
  2. As with employment responsibilities, absences impact professional accountability and academic performance evaluations. Students are expected to have back up plans for child care, transportation, and family responsibilities and to make arrangements with employers so that students can attend every class and be on time. Students should notify their professors ahead of time or as soon as possible following an absence, just as one would inform a supervisor of an absence at work or in an internship. Students’ colleagues should also be informed when the absence impacts group work for the class.
  3. It is the student’s responsibility to attend each class, to be prepared for class, and to participate in a meaningful and professional way. Recognizing, however, there are those instances when a student may be unavoidably absent from class, students may miss one class without penalty. Any absences beyond that will be penalized progressively.
  4. Repeated late arrival, early departure or extended break time will result in absence penalization at the Instructor’s discretion. In online and hybrid courses, class attendance is represented through a variety of assignments, activities that demonstrate class engagement.
  5. As in all courses, but particularly in online and hybrid courses, active and consistent participation is required and critical to student success. Failure to fulfill online and hybrid course expectations and requirements jeopardize student learning and academic success, therefore the grading table presented above also is utilized in online and hybrid course attendance.
  6. A student who is unable to participate in any class, examination or assignment due to his or her religious holy day requirements shall not be penalized, provided the instructor has been notified in writing at least two weeks prior to the absence.
  7. Students are expected to submit all assignments on time and in hard copy. Late assignments cannot be submitted without prior discussion with the professor who may deduct points for lateness. Professors may determine that late assignments are not acceptable, or they may impose a time limit beyond which a paper cannot be submitted because assignments frequently are sequential and build upon one not her. If a paper is submitted by email to meet a deadline, a hard copy of the paper is expected the next day.
  8. Students are expected to be respectful of professors and classmates during class sessions just as they would be respectful of work supervisors, field instructors, and colleagues at work or internships. Cell phones, pagers, and personal communication devices should be turned off and there should be no text messaging during class or internship meetings. If an urgent message is expected, this should be anticipated with the instructor, settings should be set to “vibrate,” and a student should leave the classroom to take the message.
  9. In both field agencies and at Brockport Downtown, students should dress appropriately to each setting. Students should inquire as to the dress code expected at their field agency.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

The MSW Program faculty recognizes certain fundamental rights and responsibilities of the student as outlined below:

Student Rights

Students have the right of protection against improper disclosure of their views, beliefs, academic records, and political associations, and from limitations upon freedom of expression with all due process of law.

  • Students have the right to be free of sexual harassment by faculty, staff, university employees, students, and in the field practicum.
  • Students have the right of protection against prejudicial or capricious academic and field evaluations, and against faculty behavior which impedes student progress, such as canceling class frequently with no mutually agreeable rescheduling, failure to provide course objectives or expectations, consistently not returning papers or exams within a reasonable period of time, and not posting or keeping regular office hours.
  • Students have the right to organize in their own interests.
  • Students have the right to establish and issue publications free of pressure aimed at controlling editorial policy. Editorials shall be written solely at the discretion the organizations sponsoring those publications. No claims of representation of the MSW program, or SUNY Brockport shall be made by these publications without prior authorization.
  • Students have the right to freely engage in activities on or off campus, in the company of their choice, exercising their rights as citizens of the community, state, and nation. Students shall not claim to represent the MSW Program, or SUNY Brockport without prior authorization.
  • Students have the right to use the resources of Brockport Downtown, subject to all the rules and regulations regarding student use of such resources.
  • Students have the right to invite and hear speakers of their choice on subjects of their choice in meetings, which students organize.
  • Students have the right to petition, through proper channels, in all matters of academic and student affairs, including changes in curriculum, field instruction, faculty advisor, grades, and in all cases of grievance.
  • Students have the right, when participating in research projects or other scholarly works under faculty direction as part of their formal academic programs, to receive appropriate recognition for their contribution to the process.
  • Students have the right to enjoy equal rights regardless of race, color, creed, religion, national origin, marital status, political affiliation or beliefs, sexual orientation, disability, sex, gender identity or age. Students have the right to consult regularly with their academic advisor for academic and professional advisement.

The above rights are protected by, and subject to, the institutional policies of SUNY Brockport.

Student Responsibilities

Although Social Work faculty make great effort to inform students of their rights, the students have the responsibility to familiarize themselves with the policies and procedures of SUNY Brockport, and the MSW Program.
Students are primarily responsible for knowing the degree requirements and following the policies that govern their academic program. Students are expected to adhere to the highest standards of professionalism as students, researchers, and social workers.
The above-mentioned rights and responsibilities are intended to facilitate:

  • Opportunities for students to organize in their own interests.
  • Opportunities for faculty and student collaboration in matters of Program policies operational procedures, and academic planning.
  • Student participation in the formulation and modification of policies affecting academic and student affairs.
  • Student participation in the development of policy, practice, and course development and presentation.
  • Student evaluation of course and field experiences.

Center for Graduate Studies’ Policies

The policies listed in this section pertain specifically to both matriculated and non-degree students enrolled in graduate courses at SUNY Brockport. However, graduate students should carefully note that there are also policies listed in other categories that apply to all students at the College, including graduate students. For example, the Grade Appeal Policy, found under the “Academic Policies” category, is applicable to all students. It is, therefore, strongly recommended that graduate students review these other policy sections.

Academic Integrity

Education cannot take place in the absence of trust. Students are expected to abide and conduct themselves by the codes of academic integrity for SUNY Brockport. The student or students responsible for a paper or presentation must be the sole authors of assignments. No paper of assignment may be submitted to fulfill the requirements of more than one course (though ideas from one course may inform assignments for multiple classes). Appropriate credit must be given for the sources of ideas. Plagiarism of any type is a major violation of academic integrity. Papers or presentations that violate any aspect of academic integrity will be penalized and are grounds for further disciplinary action.

The MSW Program follows SUNY Brockport Policy on Academic Dishonesty.

Below please find Context of Policy for Students and Definitions of Academic Dishonesty as Covered by this Policy:

Context of Policy for Students

Academic dishonesty, “cheating” and other forms of misrepresenting others’ work as your own, such as plagiarism, are considered serious breaches of academic integrity and are major violations of the standards of ethical behavior that the College expects from all its students.
When detected, as it often is, academic dishonesty can result in a range of disciplinary actions including failure on an assignment, failure of a course, or even Conduct Dismissal from the College. Records of disciplinary actions for dishonesty are kept and conduct dismissals are noted on College transcripts. The best rule is to assume that instructors expect all work (exams, papers, projects, etc.) submitted for grading to be entirely your own, done without collaboration. If the instructor allows or desires collaboration, you should assume that the instructor will make that clear in the assignment. If the instructor has not explicitly stated that collaboration is permitted, all work submitted should be entirely your own.

I. Definitions of Academic Dishonesty Covered by this Policy

Violations of the Student Academic Dishonesty Policy refer to actions related to the standards of honesty required in submission and evaluation of coursework in any undergraduate or graduate course bearing SUNY Brockport credit. These violations include, but are not limited to the following:
Plagiarism — presenting as one’s own, the exact words of another, not properly indicated by quotation marks, paraphrased text too similar to the original, ideas, or creative products of another without providing an adequate standard form of documentation to identify the source — such as footnotes, endnotes, or bibliographic documentation. Students are advised to scrupulously acknowledge and properly cite all sources to give appropriate credit for borrowed materials.

  1. Fabricating facts, data, statistics, or other forms of evidence included in papers, laboratory experiments, theses, or other assignments.
  2. Presenting someone else’s examination results, paper, computer work, or other material as one’s own work. This includes work done as part of group/team effort unless collaboration has been specifically approved by the instructor for any particular assignment. Students should always assume that any out-of-class assignments or take-home examinations are to be done individually and without help or collaboration unless the instructor specifically states otherwise. Students should not generalize from one assignment to another as instructors may permit collaboration on some assignments but not on others.
  3. Representing one’s own performance as another’s or knowingly allowing such misrepresentation to occur, e.g., signing another student into class; taking an exam for another student; writing or attempting to write an examination, paper, computer work, or other material for another student.
  4. Buying and selling or sharing of examinations or assignments; being in possession of examinations or answers to examinations without the instructor’s permission.
  5. Using “cheat sheets,” looking onto another’s paper, talking to someone other than the instructor or proctor during an examination, or using any other method of communication (e.g. cell phones, text messaging) during an examination without the instructor’s permission.
  6. Failing to follow the rules of conduct for taking an examination as stipulated by the instructor prior to the examination or as stated in a written course syllabus.
  7. Presenting work for a current course (e.g. papers, projects, research) that is substantially the same as a previous submission for another course without obtaining the current instructor’s prior consent to do so. When the courses are taught in the same semester, informing and obtaining prior approval of both course instructors is required to avoid a possible dishonesty charge.

Additional Policies & Resources

Harassment and Discrimination Policy

The MSW Program is committed to non-discrimination and takes pride in maintaining an environment that celebrates diversity. The Program staunchly supports and abides by SUNY Brockport’s Harassment and Discrimination Policy which states:

“SUNY Brockport will not tolerate discrimination or harassment of any type, from any source. It is the responsibility of all College administrators, supervisors, employees, and students to create and maintain a workplace and academic environment free from discrimination and harassment.”

Social Media Policy

All students are expected to adhere to the ethical standards of the profession when interacting with classmates, field instructors and colleagues when using social media or social networking sites. Students should refrain from establishing informal relationships with clients and faculty through social media as it may be difficult to maintain professional boundaries. All postings on social media sites must follow confidentiality guidelines and should reflect the highest professional standards and students should think carefully as to how their postings would reflect on them, the colleges and the profession. Violations can be subject to disciplinary actions by the program, the department and the college.

Program Academic Concerns

Each semester and throughout the semester, students’ progress will be evaluated by the faculty who are providing instruction and by the academic advisors to ensure that students are meeting standards for continuation in the Program. Students are expected to maintain a GPA of 3.0 during all semesters. No grade below a C is considered passing at the graduate level.

A minimum grade of B- is required for all practice and clinical courses (SWK 508, 601, 602, 604, 605, 616, 645, 654, and 680). A minimum of B is required for a satisfactory grade (S) in all field courses (610, 611, 612, & 613).

Student/Faculty Concerns

Normally, student/faculty concerns are resolved at the Program level with the individual faculty member. If not resolved, they are referred to the MSW Program Director. If necessary, concerns of an academic nature should then be addressed in writing to the Social Work Department Chair, and then the Associate Dean of the School of Education, Health and Human Services.

Code of Student Conduct

All Students at SUNY Brockport are bound by the Student Code of Conduct. Students are asked to read and accept the Code of Conduct annually at time of course registration.

Student Accessibility Services

Students with documented disabilities may be entitled to specific accommodations. Student Accessibility Services makes this determination. To inquire on obtaining an official letter to the course instructor detailing any approved accommodations.

  • The student is responsible for providing the course instructor with an official letter.
  • Faculty work as a team with Student Accessibility services to meet the needs of students with disabilities.
  • For information on students’ rights to appeal an academic accommodation, click here.

Student Accessibility Services Disability Statement

SUNY Brockport is committed to fostering an optimal learning environment by applying current principles and practices of equity, diversity, and inclusion. If you are a student with a disability and want to utilize academic accommodations, you must register with Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to obtain an official accommodation letter which must be submitted to faculty for accommodation implementation. If you think you have a disability, you may want to meet with SAS to learn about related resources.
You can find out more about Student Accessibility Services by contacting SAS via sasoffice@brockport.edu or (585) 395-5409. Students, faculty, staff, and SAS work together to create an inclusive learning environment.

Course & Curriculum Information

Academic Calendar

The MSW Program follows SUNY Brockport academic calendars and is strictly adhered to for billing, course registration deadlines, and related academic and administrative policies. The complete academic year calendar can be found online.

Course Registration

  1. Incoming students are registered by the program for their first semester courses.
  2. Students entering their second semester (spring) will need to contact their advisor to receive an advisor key code; key codes are not required after the second semester.
  3. Students will register themselves for all subsequent semesters but should meet with their academic advisor in advance of course registration.

Class Schedules

Both day and evening sections of courses are offered as necessary to accommodate students in both the full-time and part-time programs. Classes are scheduled to meet once a week, during the early part of the day, late afternoon or early evening.

  • Full time students generally take daytime courses, but due to seating availability/caps, evening sections may be the only option.
  • Part time students generally enroll in evening classes, again, based on seating availability, part-time students may register for daytime sections.
  • Changes may be requested and are based on a space available basis with instructor or director approval.

Please Note: Days, times, seat availability and method of instruction may be changed without prior notice to students by the MSW Program or the College.

The official fall, winter, spring and summer course schedules may be found here. Course schedules are available for viewing on Banner as follows:

Semester Schedule Available
Fall Mid-March
Winter October
Spring Mid-October
Summer March

Directed Study

The purpose of a directed study is to allow students to engage in research and/or study in a specialty area that is not available through established course offerings. A directed study is not designed to resolve schedule conflicts. It requires a comparable workload, a similar time frame, and the same quality level of work as in the regular courses.

Online – Synchronous Learning Class Expectations and Etiquette

  • Be dressed in clothes you would typically wear to class.
  • Professionalism is a key aspect of social work and should be maintained on all Zoom meetings.
  • You should be sitting up throughout class.
  • Your video needs to be on the majority of the time. If you need to step away for a moment or there is a disturbance, you can turn of your camera for a few moments.
  • Your mute should be on unless you are talking or in a small group setting.
  • Please make sure that wherever you choose to zoom that it is an appropriate setting (i.e. a place that you don’t mind others seeing).
  • Please limit visual distractions including eating, drinking, talking to others in your house, watching television, or other actions that can be distracting to others on the Zoom call.
  • We understand that your home may also house parents, children, significant others, roommates, and pets. We also understand you may sometimes need to attend to those that live in your household. We completely accept that and just ask if the distraction level is going to be high; you let your instructor know and turn your camera off and mute yourself.
  • Ask permission before you screenshot or record a lecture!
  • Switch to gallery view to view your classmates during discussions.

Attendance

The student is responsible for all assigned course work and cannot be absolved of this responsibility. When enrolled in a course, the student is obligated to do all the work assigned. Punctual and regular attendance is vital to the discharge of this obligation. Absences, excused or not, do not alter this responsibility.

  • Absences will be excused for (a) documented illnesses, (b) official representation of the College, (c) death of a close relative, (d) religious holiday, and (e) other circumstances beyond the control of the student.
  • Excuses for official representation of the College must be obtained from the official supervising that activity or event.
  • Students whose unexcused absences exceed 15 percent of the scheduled classes and laboratories may receive a lowered grade or failure at the instructor’s discretion.
  • Repeated late arrival, early departure or extended break time will result in absence penalization at the Instructor’s discretion. In online and hybrid courses, class attendance is represented through a variety of assignments, activities that demonstrate class engagement.
  • As in all courses, but particularly in online and hybrid courses, active and consistent participation is required and critical to student success. Failure to fulfill online and hybrid course expectations and requirements jeopardize student learning and academic success.
  • A student who is unable to participate in any class, examination or assignment due to his or her religious holy day requirements shall not be penalized, provided the instructor has been notified in writing at least two weeks prior to the absence.

The College’s attendance appeal policy and procedures is available online.

Mandatory New Student Orientation

A group orientation program is held for all incoming students. During orientation students meet the faculty and each other and to receive a general overview of the institutional and program mission Program and goals. Students learn about institutional resources including library and information technology resources, registration information about courses, information about Brockport Downtown, and other pertinent information. Students are also advised at that time and at other points in the semester. In advance of the orientation, students are provided a link to the MSW Student Handbook and are asked to read the handbook in advance of the orientation meeting so that their specific questions may be addressed during advisement meetings.

MSW Academic Convocation & Special Events

Students are expected to attend MSW Program Convocations and special events. These programs will be listed in syllabi and on the MSW academic calendar.

Immunization Records

All students registered for classes at SUNY Brockport, regardless of the number of credit hours, must provide proof of immunity to measles, mumps and rubella, and provide a meningitis response.

*Students born before 1957 are exempt

Before classes begin, all graduate students must submit immunization history to include:

  • Proof of immunity to Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR)
  • Submit date of meningitis vaccine which must be within five years of start of classes or online declination of vaccine.

These requirements must be completed before classes begin or the student will be deregistered and not permitted to attend classes. In addition, a hold will be placed on the student’s account and the Registrar will charge a fee to re-register the classes. For more information click here.

Conferral of the MSW Degree

All requirements for the MSW degree, including a minimum GPA of 3.0, must be successfully completed prior to commencement. All financial obligations of SUNY Brockport must be fulfilled before the degree will be awarded. On the official transcript, a statement will be posted that all requirements have been met as of the end of the term in which requirements are completed. Students completing degree requirements in August or December will receive their diplomas once degree requirements are verified.

Credit for Life Experience Policy

The MSW Program does not grant credit for life experience. Consistent with CSWE accreditation standards, no exceptions are made to this policy.

Graduate Studies Resources & Information

Federal Financial Aid – Graduate Loans

This federal loan is for matriculated students who are enrolled at least half-time (six credits). It has a low fixed interest rate and repayment begins six months after the student graduates or falls below half-time enrollment. The Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is not need based and interest does accrue during in-school periods. Apply yearly by filing the FAFSA by the college’s suggested deadline to ensure funds for the fall. No separate application is required. Limits exist as to how much Federal Stafford Loan a graduate student can borrow. The limits are annual and aggregate.

Graduate Continuous Enrollment Policy

Continuous enrollment requires, at a minimum, the completion of one graduate level course each 12 months. A matriculated student who discontinues enrollment, unless granted a leave of absence, will lose matriculated status and must apply for readmission. Should readmission be offered at that time, the applicant must then meet any new requirements for admission, as well as any new requirements for the degree at the time of readmission.

Graduate Studies Forms

Find all the current forms in use, including course/program withdrawal, Temporary Academic Leave, Independent Study and Application for Graduation.

Graduate Full-Time Status & Enrollment Verification

A graduate student at SUNY Brockport has full-time status for Enrollment Verification purposes when: enrolled for at least 9 graduate credits per semester and/or registered for thesis credit(s). Full-time graduate student enrollment for tuition and federal financial aid purposes begins at 12 graduate credits per semester. Graduate student eligibility for federal student loans begins at 6 graduate credits per semester.

Temporary Leave of Absence

Students whose progress toward degree completion is interrupted by circumstances beyond their control may apply for up to a year’s leave of absence. Application for such a leave is made to the student’s department. Leaves of absence approved by the department will not be charged against the time for degree completion, as stipulated by SUNY Brockport policy. If circumstances warrant, students may apply for extensions of such leaves, up to a maximum of three years in total leave time.

Degree Time Limit

A student seeking the MSW degree must complete the requirements in five calendar years from the date of matriculation.

Health Insurance Policy

SUNY Brockport requires that domestic students comply with health insurance regulations as federally mandated by the Affordable Care Act. This law requires that all individuals have health insurance.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. In accordance with FERPA, the MSW Program has adopted certain policies addressing the security of student’s academic work-papers, projects, exams, etc. It is not possible for faculty to post grades or to leave students’ completed work in the MSW office. Students’ work must be returned to individuals at class, to students’ homes via the mail (students must provide postage for assignments and grades from faculty to be mailed to their homes), or through other means as arranged by the student and faculty member to safeguard confidentiality. These policies will help to assure students’ privacy with regards to grades and coursework.

SUNY Brockport Emergency Notification

The Emergency Alert System at SUNY Brockport will be activated. Students are encouraged to maintain updated contact information using the link on the College’s Emergency Information website, included on the website is detailed information about the College’s emergency operations plan, classroom emergency preparedness, evacuation procedures, emergency numbers, and safety videos. In addition, students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the Emergency Procedures posted in classrooms, halls, and buildings and all college facilities.”

Program Grading

Grade Quality Points (Description)
A (95-100) 4.0 (Distinguished work)
A- (90-94) 3.7
B+ (87-89) 3.3 (Quality expected at graduate level)
B (84-86) 3.0 (Average)
B- (81-83) 2.7 (Below average at graduate level)
C+ (77-79) 2.3 (Barely adequate work)
C (74-76) 2.0 (C- is not a passing grade)
E (Below 74) 0.0 (Failure)

Grade Point Average – Students are considered in good academic standing if their overall GPA is 3.0 or higher.

Grading System – Letter grades are given for each course.

Final Grades – Final grades may be found on Banner. Students do not receive mid-term grades.

Academic Standing/Academic Probation

Graduate students who have completed at least nine graduate credits at Brockport and who’s cumulative Brockport graduate GPA falls below 3.0 will be placed on Academic Probation I – Students receive written notification of their probationary status from The Center for Graduate Studies.
Satisfactory, Unsatisfactory (S/U) – Letter grades use to measure student achievement in certain designated courses. Credit hours are earned for satisfactory work, but such grades are not included in the grade point average. S/U grades are used for field seminar section, SWK 504, 505, 610, 611, 612, and 613.

  • Grading policies for generalist and advanced year Field Practicum and Field Seminar courses may be found in the Field Education Manual and syllabi for these courses.

Incomplete (I) – A grade of Incomplete or “I” should be submitted only where circumstances beyond the student’s control prevent the student from completing a minor part of the required work and some additional time is needed.

  • Incomplete grades must be resolved within six weeks of the end of the semester grading cycle.
  • Incomplete grades not resolved by the date specified on the Incomplete Contract are automatically converted to an “E.
  • An “I” grade does not impact the cumulative grade point average, the “I” grade remains on the transcript along with the final grade earned for the course.

In Progress (PR) – Certain courses by design are not intended to be completed in one semester. This is a common practice for particular kinds of graduate courses. For these courses, the “PR” grade is used instead of an “I”. This designation may remain on the transcript for a maximum of two semesters, after which the grade is automatically changed to an “I”. Courses must be approved through the Registrar’s Office in advance to allow an instructor to submit the “PR” grade.

Withdraw (W) – A “W” is entered when a student leaves a course after the drop period has ended or when a student leaves Brockport entirely during a semester; a “W” grade also stays on the transcript. If the student does not withdraw before the assigned date, a grade of “E” may be assigned. The instructor WILL NOT withdraw students from their courses. It is the sole reasonability of the student to withdraw from any course which they want a W grade.

Please see the complete policy for “I”, “W” and “PR” grades.

Courses Requiring a Grade of B- or Higher (Passing)

  • The following practice courses require a grade of B- or higher: SWK 501, 502, 508, 601, 602, 604, 605, 616, 645, 654, and 680.
  • Field seminar/practicum require a 3.0 or higher for a grade of Satisfactory (S) in: SWK 504 & 505; SWK 610 & 611; SWK 612 & 613.

Repeating an MSW Course (APA Reference Guideline)

Students may not repeat any course more than once.

The MSW Program uses the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual – 7th edition as the official reference source for the Program. Students are expected to utilize these guidelines for all assignments. APA guidelines are used for crediting appropriate sources, formatting all elements of documents, and proper use of language (e.g., culturally, gender, and academically appropriate). Faculty may penalize students for failure to utilize APA guidelines properly.

Please visit the SUNY Brockport Drake Memorial Library’s website.

Redundancy Policy for Transfer Credit or Course Waiver

Transfer Credit Policy

In order to avoid redundancy while promoting program integrity, the MSW Program will consider transfer credit for students who have completed and mastered comparable course content in a graduate course prior to admission to the MSW program. Graduate transfer credit may come from course work taken in another MSW Program, a Master’s degree in a related field, or graduate course work taken elsewhere. Decisions about transfer credit for a required course are made on a case-by-case assessment examining criteria which include a review of the course syllabus (and graded assignments where requested) and a grade of B or better in a comparable course taken within the past five years of admission to the program.

A student wishing to apply for transfer graduate credit should refer to the guidelines for transfer credit in the MSW Student Manual and to the petition process under this redundancy policy:

  • Transfer credit must be appropriate to the MSW degree and congruent with the student’s educational plan. Students petitioning for transfer credit are advised that the faculty require evidence, beyond the transcript, which clarifies the substance of the course (e.g., course syllabus, papers or exams, catalog description, etc.). Such evidence is necessary to render a reasonable judgment on equivalence of content of MSW course work and/or relevance of electives to the student’s educational Plan of Study
  • A minimum grade of B (3.0) or higher must be earned for each course. Courses graded S/U, P/F, or Audit are not transferable.
  • The official transcript is required before awarding transfer credit.
  • Grades earned in transfer are not included in the quality point index.

Petition Process

The student must initiate the process for transfer credit for a course by petitioning the Program Director for course equivalency credit based on the belief that prior graduate course material is comparable to generalist level course work, was completed within the past five years, and has been mastered with a grade of B or higher. (See Transfer Course Petition).
The student will present the transfer course petition and the required documents to the Program Director who will assign full-time faculty to review the syllabi (and graded assignments if requested) to determine how it corresponds to the MSW course for which the student seeks transfer credit. The faculty will make a recommendation regarding transfer credit after reviewing the syllabus, and the Program Director will make the final decision.
The petition process for transfer credit should take place after the student is notified of acceptance into the MSW program, but all documentation must be received a minimum of three weeks before the start of the semester to ensure time for review and placement in the proper courses. Once a semester has begun, there are no reviews of transfer credit petitions under the redundancy policy for courses taught that semester. Students who are unable to produce the required information will not be eligible for consideration of transfer credit.

Course Waiver Policy

In order to avoid redundancy while promoting program integrity, the MSW Program will consider course waivers for students who have completed and mastered comparable generalist course content in a course prior to admission to the MSW. When a student receives a waiver from a required generalist level course, they must complete another course—usually an elective approved by an advisor—to earn the needed credit. Decisions about course waivers are made on a case-by-case assessment examining criteria which include a review of the course syllabus (and graded assignments where requested) and a grade of B or better in a comparable course taken within the past five years of admission to the program. No more than 12 credits can be waived and/or transferred in to the program, subject to the approval of the MSW faculty.

Generalist Practice Courses – Due to the clinical content in the SWK 501 & 502 and field internship SWK 504 & 505 and the imperative role of these courses in the professional development of social work students and their eligibility for clinical licensure, there is no waiver option for generalist practice and field internship courses.

Transfer Credit

  • 60 credit Program – Up to a total of 12 graduate level credits (500 or above).
  • 36-credit Program – Up to a total of 6 credits (500 or above)
  • Transfer Credit – Generally used towards elective coursework, up to 6 credits, unless otherwise approved by the Program Director.

Additional policies and procedures regarding transfer credit are as follows:

  • Transfer credit must be appropriate to the MSW degree and congruent with the student’s educational plan. Students petitioning for transfer credit are advised that the advisor ordinarily requires evidence, beyond the transcript, which clarifies the substance of the course (e.g., course outline, papers or exams, catalog description, etc.). Such evidence is necessary to render a reasonable judgment on equivalence of content of MSW course work and/or relevance of electives to the student’s educational Plan of Study
  • A minimum grade of B (3.0) or higher must be earned for each course. Courses graded S/U, P/F, or Audit are not transferable.
  • The official transcript is required before awarding transfer credit.
  • Grades earned in transfer are not included in the quality point index.
  • The course name does not appear on the transcript. Only students who petition to have transfer credit accepted for required courses will have the name of the course appear on the transcript.

Weather and Class Cancellation Policy

In the event of severe weather, conditions that create hazardous driving it may be necessary to cancel classes. MSW classes are cancelled whenever Brockport Downtown is closed. Cancellation of classes will be posted to SUNY Brockport’s website. Closings and cancellations are separate from REOC and there may be circumstances where REOC activities close, but Brockport Downtown remains open. Look for communication from the College.

Withdrawal/Dismissal

Students planning to transfer or leave the MSW Program for any reason must give immediate and formal notice in writing to the Program Director of their intention to withdraw from SUNY Brockport reserve the right to dismiss at any time a student whose conduct and/or academic standing renders the student unacceptable as a member of the MSW Program.

Program Readmission

A student who has been dismissed from the MSW Program may only reapply for admission after a waiting period of at least one calendar year. Readmission will be at the discretion of the MSW Program. MSW students can be readmitted to the Program only once. Students who are readmitted may apply for consideration only those courses in which they received a grade of B or better towards their degree program. Students who are readmitted must meet the requirements in effect at the time of readmission and must meet with their faculty advisor to complete a new plan of study.
Transcripts list the following academic status of students following the term or semester:
Good Academic Standing, Probation, or Academic Dismissal. These notations are based on the overall academic performance of the student.

Current Students

Please visit the SUNY Brockport Current Students page for a complete list of support services and College departments.

Personal Information

Change of Address/Phone Number

If you have any changes in your contact information from your acceptance into the program; including mailing or email addresses, phone contacts or name change due to marriage or divorce. Change of contact information is submitted through Web Banner.

  1. Go to Web Banner
  2. Log in using your NetID and password
  3. Go to Personal Information

Name Change/Correction

Please complete the Name Change Form if you have recently married, divorced, changed your name legally since you applied/enrolled or spelling corrections.

Graduate Assistantships

Information about application for various MSW Graduate Assistantships is provided by faculty through advisement, in-class announcements, and postings on the MSW listserv and MSW bulletin boards. Additionally, they are posted on the websites of SUNY Brockport.

Printing/Photocopying Services

Scanning/copying services for students are located on the 5th floor of Brockport Downtown site. Please ask Brockport Downtown staff for assistance.

Social Work Student Association

The Student Social Work Organization is student organized, led, and directed with input from a faculty advisor. The purpose of the organization is to provide a forum for student activities within the context of the educational mission, goals, and objectives of the MSW Program.

Brockport Downtown

Brockport Downtown is the home of the MSW Program. Brockport Downtown is co-located at SUNY Brockport’s Rochester Educational Opportunity Center at 161 Chestnut Street Rochester, NY 14604.

In addition to the MSW Faculty offices and modern classrooms, Brockport Downtown offers walk-up computer stations on the fifth floor, a student lounge, IT support and Brockport Downtown Librarian are also located on the 5th floor.

For more information about our downtown site please see below.

  • Food – Vending machines are located on the 2nd floor. Vending machines accept cash and credit cards. There is also a Bistro, “B-STRO,” located on the first floor. The B-STRO is open for full service and takeout for lunch with sandwiches and soups available prior to evening classes.
  • Brockport Downtown Student Page – Contains information and resources for students taking classes at our downtown site.

Student ID

The SUNY Brockport Eagle One ID cards are required each time you enter the facility and must be shown upon request by security or Brockport Downtown staff. ID photos are taken at the main campus in Brockway or Brockport Downtown, 5th floor, hours posted outside IT Room.

Stolen ID’s with a police report are replaced for free. Lost ID’s without a police report are $25 through BASC. Please contact a Brockport Downtown staff member for additional information at downtown@brockport.edu.

Downtown Parking

Parking options include on-street (free after 6:00 pm), Washington Square Garage, Midtown Garage, and Court Street. If you are taking classes primarily at Brockport Downtown, you do not need to purchase a Student Parking permit from the main campus.

Barnes & Noble Bookstore (Textbook)

There are several options for obtaining your books. For more information, please call (585) 395- 2554 or visit the bookstore web page link at SUNY Brockport.

To view required textbooks for courses, follow the steps below: you may click on the bookstore link above, go to:

  1. Go to Quicklinks
  2. Click on Course Schedule
  3. Select a Term
  4. Subject: Social Work (MSW)
  5. View/Purchase Textbooks

Books may also be purchased in-person with cash, check or credit card: American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa or your Title IV Financial Aid may be used Books may also be ordered on-line and shipped to your home; FREE GROUND SHIPPING ON ORDERS $49 OR MORE!

Students may also utilize available financial aid through the Brockport Barnes & Noble Bookstore ONLY. Please see the instructions below for using your student financial aid to purchase textbooks.

  1. If you are planning on using Easy Money, as your method of payment, you will need to complete the following:
  2. Go to www.basc1.org and follow the directions under Easy Money, Student accounts.
  3. From here, you can create a new account, add money to an existing account, and transfer money from your financial aid. After you have successfully loaded money onto your account you will be able to use Easy Money in the bookstore.

Students may also purchase books through other retail sites such as, Amazon or other discount web locations if they wish.

MSW ListServ (Faculty/Staff and Student Mass Emailing)

AAll students and faculty/staff are automatically enrolled for the MSW Distribution List, Brockport MSW Program (mswprogram@brockport.edu) with their Brockport student email account. The distribution list is used to send current program information, College/community events, and job postings.

OnTheHub (Free Software)

OnTheHub can be used by Students, Faculty, and Staff to download free such as Microsoft Office Professional (2016 & 2019) and Windows 10 or discounted versions of many of the software titles used at the college, such as Adobe Creative Cloud, SPSS, Minitab, Norton software, and many others.

Brockport Information Technology Services (BITS)

We support the technology used by the College community in pursuit of their mission.

IT Service Desk

The IT Service Desk is the primary technology support for students, faculty and staff of SUNY Brockport. You can reach us:

  • Phone: (585) 395-5151 Option 1
  • Self-service portal

Technology at SUNY Brockport

When you begin your journey at Brockport, your first steps will involve technology. Setting up your accounts with passwords is essential. To guide you through technology readiness at Brockport, please follow this brief tutorial by clicking on the link above that will introduce you to the following:

  • Your Accounts at Brockport
  • Blackboard and Brightspace (as of spring 2023)
  • Student Email – Office 365
  • Other Technology Resources
  • Recommended Technology
  • Technology Support

How-to Blackboard at Brockport

A guide for students and faculty on how to use Blackboard and its tools.

MSW Information and Orientation

Incoming students and current students may access resources for the College, Brockport Downtown, program information, College Departments, Field Education and student information, such as:

Information/Resources

  • New Student Information
  • Barnes & Noble Bookstore
  • Campus Services and Departments
  • Downtown Parking
  • APA writing resources
  • Self-Care Materials
  • Registration and Plans of Study
  • Announcements

You may access the MSW Information and Orientation Page by following these steps.

  1. Go to Quick Links
  2. Click on Blackboard
  3. Go to My Organizations
  4. Click on MSW Information and Orientation

Appendices

Table of Contents